Vierling Cigar Shop (1862)

By David Schleper

Henry George Vierling built a home in Shakopee after moving from Eagle Creek in 1862. It was built on Third Street, just east of St. Mark’s school.

Horse drawn carriage in the 1890s, with L.A. Nachtsheim driving and Herbert Strunk and George Vierling in the back
Horse drawn carriage in the 1890s, with L.A. Nachtsheim driving and Herbert Strunk and George Vierling in the back

Several years later, Mr. Vierling added the Vierling Cigar Shop in the rear of the home. It was also a shoe shop for a short time. Louis Winters, a cigar maker, helped set up the cigar business with Mr. Vierling.

One of the most famous brands was the “Diamond-S” cigars. The cigars were advertised by a bit of home scenery, christened after a famous home brand of flour, and appreciated in Shakopee. The Vierling cigars were of such a uniformly good quality that they advertised themselves, and the factory had a flourishing trade not only in Shakopee, but in neighboring towns and in the Twin Cities. Mr. Vierling used the best fillers in the different grades, and returned to the factory all trimmings and other waste rather than use them to his profit and to the deterioration of his goods. Careful buying of stock, having workmen who were expert in the goods, and skilled management of the business brought a fair measure of reward.

Vierling Cigar Box
Above is a cigar box of Vierling’s, from Scott County Historical Society.

And here is another view of the box:

Vierling Cigar Box

John Velz and Joseph Coller served as apprentices in the cigar making trade, though they did not follow the business. Henry George Vierling’s two sons, John and George Vierling, continued to manufacture the C.O.F. and White Lily cigars.

When John Vierling died, the old shop was abandoned as a cigar factory, but the house portion continued to be used as a residence. In February 1935, the house and business were torn down, destroying the landmark.

(Some information from Scott County Argus, October 7, 1897; and Shakopee Argus Tribune, February 21, 1935.)

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