Upcoming Events

Home Sweet Home: Dwellings in Early Shakopee

Home Sweet Home: Dwellings in Early ShakopeeSaturday, Jan. 12, 10:30 a.m.-Noon | Free | Shakopee Public Library

From the tipi tanka (bark lodges) of the Dakotas, to the Faribault Trading Post, to the Pond Mission House, to the beginning houses of early Shakopee, this presentation will describe some of the shanties, hewed log cabins to beginning houses with board floors and shingle roofs that formed the beginning of Sha K’ Pay, Minnesota Territory.

No pre-registration required.

“We Were Strong!” More Women in Early Shakopee

Tuesday, March 12, 1-2 p.m. | Free | Shakopee Community Center Ṡakpe ti Senior Lounge

Ten more women in early Shakopee and their impact on the community will be discussed, including Hopstina Makaakaniwankewin, Black Flute Lucy Otherday, Sarah Butts Wakefield, Winona Nancy McClure Faribault Huggan, Ellen Marie Oleson Jorgenson, Isabel David Higbee, Ruth Gardner, Mazasnawin Iron Woman Rosalie Frenere Mooers, Alice Briggs, Melinda Perry Apgar, and Marilyn Laddusaw Lang.

Please register for program CD 312 at the Shakopee Community Center or online through Shakopee Parks and Recreation by Tuesday, March 5.

Sparkling! Industry in Early Shakopee

Sparkling! coverSaturday, March 16, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | FreeShakopee Public Library

Most people know about Amazon and Shutterfly, but long ago, Shakopee had many industries starting in the 1800s. Besides Rock Spring Bottling Company, the mills, the breweries, the soap and brick were all part of early Shakopee. Learn about some of the early industry in early Shakopee in this presentation.

No pre-registration required.

“We Were Here, Too!” African Americans in Early Shakopee

We Were Here, Too! CoverTuesday, April 9, 1-2 p.m. | Free | Shakopee Community Center Ṡakpe ti Senior Lounge

In the 19th century, several African Americans lived in Shakopee. This presentation will include: interpreter and builder, James Thompson; farmer and laborer, Dan Eddings; baseball player, Billy Williams; Joseph Godfrey, who was enslaved and escaped from the area later called Shakopee; Joseph Graham, who was a carriage driver for Dr. Fischer, and a servant, Alice Briggs, whose spirit still lingers in downtown Shakopee.

Please register for program CD 409 at the Shakopee Community Center or online through Shakopee Parks and Recreation by Tuesday, April 2.

Glory Hallelujah! Churches in Early Shakopee

Glory Hallelujah! coverSaturday, April 13, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | FreeShakopee Public Library

St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church, which was built but never used, the German St. Mark’s Catholic Church and the Church of Immaculate Conception (later called St. Mary’s) for the Irish in Shakopee, the First Presbyterian Church (now the Igelsia del Dios Vivo, Columna y Adoyo de la Verdad, La Luz Del Mundo), are discussed. St. John’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church, St. Mary’s Church of the Purification, the Assembly of God Church, and the Russian Evangelical Baptist Church, among others, will also be presented at this presentation.

No pre-registration required.